Creating Hastags for Social Media with a Drafts Action

Creating meaningful, long #hastags can be a pain in the butt.

There you are, writing up a witty tweet or making that perfect caption for your instagram pic and you realize that you have a fantastic idea for a hash tag that is more of a sentence than a single word.

You proceed to write it out and unleash your masterpiece to the world and just as you hit the submit button you notice that you have a typo, or the wrong spelling of a word and #ohcrap you need to delete and retweet!

That lead me to write a Drafts Action to take care of that.

I’ll leave others to write about the virtues of Drafts, but it’s fantastic.

The Action I created has two steps: (1) to run some JavaScript and (2) to copy the contents of the draft to the Clipboard. You can get my action here.

Here’s the JavaScript that I used to take a big long sentence and turn it into a social media worthy hashtag

var contents = draft.content;
var newContents = "#";


editor.setText(newContents+contents.replace(/ /g, "").toLowerCase());

Super simple, but holy crap does it help!

Installing fonts in Ulysses

One of the people I follow online, Federico Viticci, is an iOS power user, although I would argue that phrase doesn’t really do him justice. He can make the iPad do things that many people can’t get Macs to do.

Recently he posted an article on a new font he is using in Ulysses and I wanted to give it a try. The article says:

Installing custsom fonts in Ulysses for iOS is easy: go to the GitHub page, download each one, and open them in Ulysses (with the share sheet) to install them.

Simple enough, but it wasn’t clicking for me. I kept thinking I had done something wrong. So I thought I’d write up the steps I used so I wouldn’t forget the next time I need to add a new font.

Downloading the Font

  1. Download the font to somewhere you can get it. I chose to save it to iCloud and use the Files app
  2. Hit Select in the Files app
  3. Click Share
  4. Select Open in Ulysses
  5. The custom font is now installed and being used.

Checking the Font:

  1. Click the ‘A’ in the writing screen (this is the font selector) located in the upper right hand corner of Ulysses

  1. Notice that the Current font indicates it’s a custom font (in This case iA Writer Duospace:

Not that hard, but there’s no feedback telling you that you have been successful so I wasn’t sure if I had done it or not.